MACHEN!

The German winners of the 2011/2012 Holcim Awards

Exhibition:
13 July - 30 August 2012

Opening:
13. Juli 2012, 19.30 Uhr

Exhibition opening speakers:
Dr. h.c. Kristin Feireiss, Aedes
Ilka and Andreas Ruby, Curators, Ruby Press

Accompanying the exhibition is the publication MACHEN!, Ruby Press, 2012.

---------------------------------

Accompanying discussions at the ANCB:

Three discussions (in German) accompanying the exhibition will take place at the ANCB Metropolitan Laboratory. Prizewinners will present their projects and update the audience on their current state. The first discussion will take place on Friday, 13 July 2012 at 6 PM prior to the exhibition opening.

Friday, 13 July 2012, at 6 PM
Savoir Vivre: How the city can be (re)built to accommodate a variety of lifestyles with Matthias Sauerbruch of Sauerbruch Hutton and Jan Edler and Tim Edler of realities:united.

Friday, 3 August 2012, 6 PM
Heating with Concrete, Cooling with Adobe: How materials can be exploited throughout their spectrum with Frank Barkow of Barkow Leibinger Architekten and Mike Schlaich from the TU Berlin; Anna Heringer and Martin Rauch of Heringer Rauch Nägele Waibel Naji

Friday, 17 August 2012, 6 PM
Old Materials Re-invented: How old building traditions can be modernized with Francis Kéré, Kéré Architecture; Eike Roswag, Ziegert | Roswag | Seiler

Conception and moderation:
Ilka and Andreas Ruby, Ruby Press, Berlin

Location:
ANCB The Metropolitan Laboratory, Christinenstr. 18-19, 10119 Berlin

 

Aedes Cooperation Partners

 

powered by BauNetz

  • Ilka and Andreas Ruby, Curators, Ruby Press

  • Barkow Leibinger, Architekten, Berlin: infra-lightweight concrete

  • Ziegert | Roswag | Seiler Architekten Ingenieure, Berlin: bamboo construction

  • Accompanying discussion MACHEN 1
    Andreas Ruby, Curator, Ruby Press/ Matthias Sauerbruch, Sauerbruch Hutton/ Tim Edler, realities:united

  • Accompanying discussion MACHEN 1
    Matthias Sauerbruch, Sauerbruch Hutton

  • Accompanying discussion MACHEN 1
    Edward Schwarz, Holcim Foundation for Sustainable Construction/ Tim Edler, realities:united

  • Accompanying discussion MACHEN 1
    Francis Kéré, Kéré Architecture

  • Accompanying discussion MACHEN 2
    Andreas Ruby, Curator, Ruby Press/ Martin Rauch and Anna Heringer, Heringer Rauch Nägele Waibel Naji
    Architekten/ Mike Schlaich, TU Berlin/ Frank Barkow, Barkow Leibinger Architekten

  • Accompanying discussion MACHEN 3
    Eike Roswag, Ziegert | Roswag | Seiler Architekten Ingenieure/ Francis Kéré, Kéré Architecture/
    Andreas Ruby, Curator, Ruby Press

  • Accompanying discussion MACHEN 3
    Ulla Giesler, Aedes Berlin/ Andreas Ruby, Curator, Ruby Press/ Francis Kéré, Kéré Architecture/
    Eike Roswag, Ziegert | Roswag | Seiler Architekten Ingenieure/ Ilka Ruby, Curator, Ruby Press

  • Accompanying discussion MACHEN 3
    Francis Kéré, Kéré Architecture/ Eike Roswag, Ziegert | Roswag | Seiler Architekten Ingenieure/
    Edward Schwarz, Holcim Foundation for Sustainable Construction

  • Accompanying discussion MACHEN 3
    Francis Kéré talking with a guest

  • Wandelement aus Lehm
    Foto: Francis Kéré

  • Sitra Headquarters in Helsinki von Sauerbruch Hutton
    Foto: Sauerbruch Hutton

  • Smart Material House in Hamburg von Barkow Leibinger
    Foto: Barkow Leibinger

  • Schulungszentrum für Nachhaltigkeit in Marrakesch von Heringer Rauch Nägele Waibel Naji
    Foto: Heringer Rauch Nägele Waibel Naji

  • Flussbad in Berlin von realities:united
    Foto: realities:united

  • Collège de Gando von Kéré Architecture
    Foto: Kéré Architecture

  • Lehmschule in Tipu Sultan Merkez in Pakistan von Ziegert Roswag Seiler
    Foto: Ziegert Roswag Seiler

Initially launched as a positive desideratum for building, the concept of sustainability has over time become increasingly problematic. Few projects today can dispense with the “s” word, or resist the temptation to obscure the dirty little secrets of construction with a halo of ecological benevolence. Thanks to greenwashing, deceptive marketing, and whitewashed statistics, the word sustainability often amounts to little more than a PR line, its meaning dissolved like an effervescent tablet in a water glass.

But in light of a series of failed climate summits, we now more than ever need a genuine discourse about sustainable construction. Since 2004 the Holcim Foundation for Sustainable Construction has promoted architectural projects that approach sustainability not as a mere technological embellishment, but as a key design principle. In order to support their realization, a total of US$2 million is awarded every three years as prize money in five regional and one global competition. The extraordinary number of German architects among this year’s winners – five of them based in Berlin – provided the impetus for this celebratory exhibition.

The exhibition MACHEN! details the developmental trajectories of six prizewinning projects: original competition panels are displayed alongside models, detailed studies, and 1:1 prototypes,  which together highlight the ways in which the projects presented have progressed since receiving the award.

In his native village of Gando, Burkina Faso, Francis Kéré is currently in the process of casting his largest adobe building to date. The secondary school will complement a series of smaller educational facilities in Gando, also built by Kéré, and demonstrates how adobe—an ancient building material—can be developed further using contemporary technologies. The work of Ziegert  | Roswag | Seiler and the team of Anna Heringer, Martin Rauch, Nägele Waibel Architekten, together with Salima Naji, pursues a similar vein, with their respective adobe and bamboo school in Pakistan and training center for sustainability in Morocco.

“Flussbad,” an urban intervention by realities:united, reappropriates a river as a swimming pool. The project makes reference to Berlin's early 20th century urban bathing culture and demonstrates the potential of projects that recycle historic spatial qualities. In their design for the “Smart Material House” in Hamburg, the firm Barkow Leibinger seeks to develop concrete as a sustainable construction material. A proposed hybrid structure combines prefabricated elements of infra-lightweight concrete with laminated timber, thereby producing a kind of “concrete house of cards.”

For Helsinki’s future “Low2No” eco-district, the architects of Sauerbruch Hutton have designed a neighborhood of six-story residential and office buildings that are made entirely out of wood. Their main intention was to open up a new market for wooden high-rises; but, at the same time, the concept, which conceives “the city as a living ecological factory,” envisions a contemporary, sustainable, and urban way of living.

All six projects on display are exemplary of a new reflective approach to the topic of sustainability—a term that for the architects exhibited means much more than just outfitting conventionally designed buildings with the latest eco-gadgets available.

Instead, the role of sustainability in architecture must be grounded in the building’s conceptual underpinning and holistic design. Here, technology is only a means to an end, but not an end in itself.

 


Diese Ausstellung wurde ermöglicht mit der großzügigen Unterstützung von: